Pilates The Perfect Way To A Better Body!

One of the key components to injury prevention at Physiologix is Pilates. Pilates was initially developed by German, Joseph Pilates, during the First World War, to rehabilitate injured soldiers. It then became popular with dancers and performers as a way to stretch and strengthen the body, through a gentle but effective workout. Pilates has continued to become increasingly popular, due to its focus on posture and good alignment. Physiotherapists now widely use Pilates as an enjoyable and extremely effective way to prevent, and rehabilitate from injury.

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How to Get the Best Out of Your Muscles

Muscles contract and relax to allow the body to move. You may use them to move the body faster and therefore gain better cardiovascular fitness. You may want to hypertrophy and strengthen them with weights. There are so many ways to train, use and strengthen the muscle system. However muscles also break down. They can develop trigger points which are points within the muscle that are excessively tight. This creates an imbalance through the muscle and can result in pain and discomfort. Remedial massage, trigger point release and dry needling are fantastic ways to release these trigger points, stop the pain and gain healthy muscle tissue. Whole muscles can become tight. This is often due to poor postural positioning when doing an exercise resulting in incorrect use of a muscle and, as a result, a constant feeling of tightness that seems impossible to get rid of. Releasing the muscle using soft tissue massage helps reduce the tight sensation.

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Patello-femoral (knee cap) pain syndrome

Patello-femoral pain syndrome (PFPS) means pain relating to the patella (knee cap) and the femur (thigh bone). The knee cap sits in a small grove in the femur and slides up and down in this grove. If for some reason the patella is not correctly aligned in the grove then pain can result. This is known as patello-femoral mal-tracking.

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ITB Friction Syndrome - A Runners Nightmare

Summer is upon us and with that thousands of people are taking to the streets and running. One of the main complaints we see with runners is ITB friction syndrome. The iliotibial band is a fibrous band that runs down the outside of the thigh attaching just below the knee. It crosses a bony point called the lateral femoral condyle just to the outside of the knee and here it can rub, causing a frictioning resulting in pain. This rubbing can occur, amongst other things, because of poor biomechanics. It is often related to poor foot control, a rolling in of the hip and knee due to poor strength (usually of the gluteal, or buttock, muscles) and an overuse and tightness in the muscles at the outside of the thigh. So what can you do?

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Knee Osteoarthritis

This month we look at knee arthritis. Most people that exercise will at some time experience knee pain. Links have been made between pain that doesn’t settle and the development of osteoarthritis. So if you have any knee pain get it looked at as soon as possible and learn what you need to do for successful rehabilitation. Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the general wear and tear of the knee joint. The symptoms of OA are pain and stiffness in the knee joint and can be mild, moderate or severe.

There are several predisposing factors that we know can lead to OA:

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Manage Your Back Pain

Lumbar spine pain, or pain in the low back, can be caused by a plethora of things. These may be factors to do with injury in the spine, such as degeneration, disc bulges, and scoliosis. Or they may be due to stresses and strains put on the spine, such as prolonged sitting, excessive lifting or bending, poor posture.

Whatever in going on internally to cause your pain, we can take some simple steps to help protect our back. All the ideas below must be pain free – any problems then get in touch and our physios will help adjust things precisely for your injury.

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Rotator Cuff Injury - What is it?

The rotator cuff are a group of four small muscles that wrap around the shoulder joint, ensuring that the ball of the arm bone, the humerus, stays central in the joint, the glenoid. The shoulder joint has to move through a huge range of movement to allow us to place our hand wherever we need to. The joint relies on these rotator cuff muscles to keep the ball in the shoulder socket while we do these movements.

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