8 Physical Demands of Tennis

8 physical demands of tennis and what you need to improve your game:

-By Gena Wallis (Physiotherapist at PhysioLogix)

  1. 1.Cardiorespiratory fitness: Tennis is a stop/start sport that requires many repeated short explosive bursts of energy with average point durations of 6.3 seconds on hard court for high performance players. The predominant energy system used is 90% anaerobic and 10% aerobic however the variability of playing style, point duration, recovery times between points and overall match durations will require players to be trained both anaerobically for performance and aerobically for recovery during and after play.
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Knee Pain

1. What is patellofemoral pain (PFP)?

Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is pain surrounding or underneath the patella (knee cap). The pain can be sharp or dull and achy and can come and go during and after activity. Pain usullay occurs with activities such as squatting, lunging, running and going up and down stairs. There may be some associated swelling or puffiness around the knee and you may hear some abnormal clicking from the knee. In some cases you may feel weak or unstable like the knee’s giving out.

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Pain On The Outside Of Your Elbow?

Tennis elbow (TE) is the most common elbow condition we see in the physio clinic. It is characterised by pain on the outside of the elbow and most prevalent between the ages 30-60. Although common in tennis players you do not need to have played tennis to get this condition. It is caused by an acute or progressive overload to the common extensor tendons in your forearm that perform wrist extension or lifting the wrist up. Some examples of overload may include after a weekend of excessive gardening, a busy period at work of typing and mouse work, lifting weights incorrectly and technique problems during sports.

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Playing Tennis in the Heat: How to Manage

Exercising in Queensland during summer is hot work! The body sweats to get rid of internal heat effectively. Sweat is mainly water but also contains important electrolytes sodium and chloride and a small amount of potassium. If the loss of fluid and electrolytes with sweating is not replaced it may cause cramps, heat exhaustion and decrease exercise performance. The following article written by Dr Bergeron of the US Tennis Association includes recommendations for how to manage

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Recovery Do As The Pro’s Do

Gena Wallis has been working for Tennis Australia at the Pro Tour $25,000 Tennis tournament last week at Tennyson. For these elite athletes, jumping onto an injury early is everything. Here are a few tricks we could all learn from.

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Shoulder Injuries and The Australian Tennis Open

Every year for 3 weeks in January, Kirsty McNab, Sports Physiotherapist, owner of Physiologix, upstairs at The Gap Health and Racquet Club, is buried  under Rod Laver Stadium at The Australian Tennis Open, working with the players, based in their main changing room.

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Taping in Sport

Many of you are I hope tuned in to watch the Australian Tennis Open over the next 2 weeks. You will see many of the players wearing different types of tape, some of it helping them get through matches, maybe preventing injuries from getting worse, and often to prevent an injury from occurring.

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Tennis elbow (in tennis players)

Tennis elbow (TE) affects up to 40-50% of all tennis players in their lifetime. In tennis, repetitive strokes place large demands on the wrist extensor muscle group. Backhand strokes have been shown to invoke higher stresses on the elbow than forehand strokes. The force imparted by the ball onto the racquet during a backhand stroke is transmitted via wrist extensors to the common extensor tendon origin on the outside of the elbow. When overloaded greater than capacity, the tendon begins to break down and lead to tissue disruption, hence the feeling of pain and weakness around the elbow.

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The Australian Open Tips On Knees

Day 1 of the Australian Tennis Open and I hope you will be enjoying some of the performances these amazing athletes will be putting on. Watching you will see many of the athletes with their knees taped. In such a fast moving, dynamic game, the stresses and strains these players place on their knees is intense and many of them have early arthritic changes. Tape can be used in a multitude of ways to change the alignment of

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Top Tips from The Tennis Physio at The Australian Tennis Open

ash at AO 2020With 2020 being the 13th year Kirsty McNab, Sports Physiotherapist, is working as the physio for the Womens Draw at the Australian Tennis Open, and with Gena Wallis, Sports Physiotherapist, working at the $60K follow up tournament to the AO in Burnie, Victoria, here are a few tips on keeping players in top condition as they go deeper in the tournament, or are having to follow straight up into another high level event

RECOVERY – is everything. From treatment of ongoing issues, to recovery bathes, to compression garments, to massage, to rehydration and meals, to sleep…..you name it….all things that the physios work with the players to ensure happen well.

NIP IT IN THE BUD – any niggles get jumped on immediately.  Understanding what, why and how of something the player is experiencing helps guide what is best treatment. This is not just hands on treatment, but exercise rehab, changes in equipment, whether resting is best (not something anyone ever wants to hear), do the sports physicians and doctors that work on site need to be involved

WORK AS A TEAM – the physio has to get everyone involved that they feel the player needs to ensure the very optimal management, that may be the sports physicians, the massage therapists, the recovery centre team, the dietician, the podiatrist, their own support team and coach – everyone is on site if the player needs it.  Keeping these players at their best is very much a team effort.

Enjoy the rest of the Tennis

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What Makes Champions at the Australian Tennis Open

Kirsty McNab (Sports Physiotherapist) is an extremely experienced and valued member of the Australian Open Team, working as one of four Tennis Australian Physiotherapist for all the female athletes competing at the Open. 2018 marks her 11th year on the job.  Here she talks about some of the things that make Champions at a Tennis Grand Slam.

This year I had the wonderful and very privileged experience of working with the great Billie-Jean King. This year marked her 50th year since winning the women’s singles Australian Open in 1968, one of the 39 Grand Slam Titles she won in her incredible career. As she says, great champions aren’t just made by what they do on court, but also what they do off court.  Making time to give back to your profession, to supporting others less fortunate around you, to always taking time to appreciate all those that help you be where you are in life, to fight for what you believe in and put in the effort to change even the smallest thing, are all lessons I think we can learn from.

What else makes these champions? Dedication and hard work are everything. Hours go into the gym and on court training. But hours also go into rehabilitation. Every minor and major ache is checked out and a routine put in place to ensure it is nipped in the bud.  This means regular sports massage, self trigger pointing, pool recovery, hours of small, specific physio exercises to keep the body working perfectly, stretching sessions with the physio.  Many of these athletes spend several hours a day, every day with us in the treatment rooms under Rod Laver Arena.

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