Exercise, Equipment Pilates and Movement for Health

equipment pilates at physiologixThe importance of exercise in improving health comes through time and time again in research. This may be from things like cancer through to back pain or chronic pain conditions, for example fibromyalgia.  A recent study looking at exercise in older athletes in the British Medical journal stated the following: "Engaging in regular physical activity may be one of our best 'life enhancing medicines' and should be used extensively".

In this study higher intensity exercise was found to be more beneficial than moderate intensity exercise, following a twice a week program, at home or in a class setting. Being given a set program helped gain more motivation and compliance from participants.  At Physiologix, we are passionate about getting you moving. In our stunning private gym area, with state of the art pilates and rehabilitation equipment, we run an extensive timetable of small, pilates classes where you will have your own individualised program to follow. We also run small physio supervised classes for those needing a little more help and support.

Here is a snapshot of a few pilates based exercises and why we might be doing them.

The 'Scooter' on the reformer is a great exercise to work on hip stability and strengthen for glutes and legs. The idea is to keep your body weight and your balance on the supporting leg, as you kick back with the other leg.  Yet it is amazing how many people have done this in Pilates workouts for years before coming to us and felt the exercise more in the front of the thigh…..totally missing the point of this exercise!!! A few little tricks and this becomes one of the best buttock muscle activation and strength exercises there is.

The ‘Step Back’ on the wunda chair is one of the functional exercises that we use during our physio rehab and the Pilates classes. Depending on the springs that you are using, you can have more or less support to step up, so we can always adapt the exercises for your level. 

This is a fantastic exercise to strengthen your glutes and legs, and work on your balance and full body control.

pilates core workoutPilates is not only about rehabilitation. You can also work really hard! Our pilates instructors have a fitness background to help you to reach your fitness or sporting goals. This 'long stretch series' is an example of a challenging core work.

Our ability to mix rehab and pilates equipment together at Physiologix allows us to progress and challenge you. In this case, the addition of the BOSU for Kneeling Chariot/Lat Pull creates an added challenge by being on an unstable surface. Your deep core stabilisers need to work harder to maintain stability without compromising posture. 

Motivated? No matter how unfit or fit you are, no matter what your injuries or health issues, at Physiologix we will get you moving.  Get in to see our Sports and Exercise physios to get an individualized program for yourself, either to do in one of our many classes, or to do from home. 

What Makes Champions at the Australian Tennis Open

Kirsty McNab (Sports Physiotherapist) is an extremely experienced and valued member of the Australian Open Team, working as one of four Tennis Australian Physiotherapist for all the female athletes competing at the Open. 2018 marks her 11th year on the job.  Here she talks about some of the things that make Champions at a Tennis Grand Slam.

This year I had the wonderful and very privileged experience of working with the great Billie-Jean King. This year marked her 50th year since winning the women’s singles Australian Open in 1968, one of the 39 Grand Slam Titles she won in her incredible career. As she says, great champions aren’t just made by what they do on court, but also what they do off court.  Making time to give back to your profession, to supporting others less fortunate around you, to always taking time to appreciate all those that help you be where you are in life, to fight for what you believe in and put in the effort to change even the smallest thing, are all lessons I think we can learn from.

What else makes these champions? Dedication and hard work are everything. Hours go into the gym and on court training. But hours also go into rehabilitation. Every minor and major ache is checked out and a routine put in place to ensure it is nipped in the bud.  This means regular sports massage, self trigger pointing, pool recovery, hours of small, specific physio exercises to keep the body working perfectly, stretching sessions with the physio.  Many of these athletes spend several hours a day, every day with us in the treatment rooms under Rod Laver Arena.

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Whiplash

pain in the neckWhiplash is an injury that occurs to the spine, especially the neck, with sudden rapid movement.  This is usually after a car accident, but can occur with collisions in sport or with a blow to the head or body.

Often the pain does not start until a few hours after the incident.  The pain often then continues to escalate over the next few days.  Initially you may experience neck pain and stiffness.  This extends to all the muscles around the neck, often going into the front of the neck and around the throat, as well as the back of the neck.  A bad headache will often set in.  Vision can be affected and people often feel a “bit out if it”.  You may experience pins and needles into the face or arms.  The pain may often be accompanied by nausea.  At all times the injury should be checked medically with your GP or at the hospital.  A decision will then be made as to whether an x-ray or MRI is indicated.  This will check there is no bone damage.

In the first few days good, strong medication will help control the pain and reduce the muscle spasm.  A hot pack is usually best to use, keeping it on as much as you can, as this will help to relax the muscles further.  Gentle pain-free movement will help to keep the joints from stiffening.  Physiotherapy at this time releases tight muscles and mobilises joints to get them moving again.

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Wimbledon - What Injuries do the Players Struggle With

Gena Wallis, Physiotherapist at Physiologix, works extensively with tennis. She is involved with the Queensland Tennis Academy as well as covering many tennis events in Brisbane.  She also writes for a well known physio website and here she revewis an article all about injuries at Wimbledon:

Injuries in professional tennis are common due to the high loading demands on the body.

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Tendon Injuries at the Aussie Open 2015

This is my 8th year working at the Australian Tennis Open in Melbourne. And it is always an exciting, action packed few weeks, with very little time to sit down! Every year the level of competition gets higher and higher. The Australian Open is the first Grand Slam of the year. The players have had their time off for the year, before entering into a grueling preseason training. As a result we see a huge amount of tendon injuries, not usually seen at other events.

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Lessons from 2016 Australian Tennis Open

For the ninth year in a row Kirsty McNab, Sports Physiotherapist, from Physiologix, in The Gap, has worked at The Australian Tennis Open as one of four Tennis Australian physios working with the women. Kirsty works in a room adjoining the changing rooms, treating any of the players that require pre or post match management, as well as providing long term programs for the athletes as they go on to other tournaments. Here are a few things that Kirsty has to share with a few tips we could all learn from:

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